Florida Invasive Species iPhone App

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Invasive Species App © 2011 University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem

Invasive Species App © 2011 University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem

Florida Travel Guide: Invasive Species iPhone App

Now you can report an invasive species while you’re traveling through Florida, using an iPhone App as your guide. The free IveGot1 app uploads your sighting direcly to local and state staff to review.

Built by the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, the app was a joint project between the National Park Service, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation and the University of Florida Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants.

Invasives Species

Non-native species are animals and plants that didn’t historically live in Florida, such as the barred owl or Florida largemouth bass. There are more than 500 nonnative fish and wildlife species in Florida and more than 1180 nonnative plant species. Non-native species can become invasive if they survive in the Florida environment and take root, start to spread and impact local populations. Take the Cuban tree frog, for example, that snuck into Florida in the 1930s via packing materials, and preyed on native tree frogs. Currently, nile monitor lizards in Cape Coral threaten the Florida burrowing owl and Burmese pythons are a growing cause of concern in the Everglades.

Invasive Species App Info © 2011 University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem

Invasive Species App Info © 2011 University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem

The Invasives Species Concern

Invasive species have economic and ecological implications. Invasions cost more than $500 million per year but the greatest impact is on the native landscape, wildlife and agricultural crops. It’s estimated that within Florida more than 1.7 million acres have been infested.

The App

The IveGot1 app integrates with Florida’s outreach program for  invasive species that includes the website and 1-888-IVEGOT1 hotline. Anytime you sight an invasive animal and report it via the app, it helps the National Park Service and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation, better assess the problem and take more accurate steps to eradicate infestations before they threaten native species like melaleuca or Burmese pythons.

Invasive Species App Report Screen © 2011 University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem

Invasive Species App Report Screen © 2011 University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem

 

Distribution Mapping System

When you report a sighting from your phone, it tags your current location allowing for real-time analysis and tracking.

Invasive Species App Map  © The University of Georgia - Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health

Invasive Species App Map © The University of Georgia - Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health

 

 

Tell us…

Would you download the app and help track invasive species while on vacation?