Mickey Mouse spotted in space!

0
0
Mickey Mouse on Mercury (credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington)

Mickey Mouse on Mercury (credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington)

 

Disney Vacation Guide to Mickey Mouse in space!

Just when you thought you found every Hidden Mickey possible in Disney World, our favorite mouse shows up in space! We don’t think the Imagineer’s have this much talent though! Read below to find out how this image of Mickey Mouse is part of Mercury’s topography.

Mickey on Mercury

It was NASA’s Messenger spacecraft that took this image. The image comes from the northwest corner of the Magritte crater on the south side of the planet Mercury. Mickey’s image is caused by the shadowing of a large crate that is north of two smaller ones. The Mickey Mouse resemblance that we see isn’t map projected but part of a high-incidence-angle base map. In a nutshell, high incidence angles (this happens when the Sun is close to the horizon), give you long shadows that put emphasis on smaller geologic features (for those of you that are technical, the resolution is 200 meters/pixel).

The planet Mercury

Thought we’d give you a few interesting facts about Mercury, given that it’s so close to the sun, and Florida is known as the Sunshine State:

-since Mercury is so close to the Sun, it can only be seen from Earth just after sunset or before dawn

-Mercury’s is the smallest planet in our solar system, at only 38 % of Earth’s diameter

-if you looked at the sun from Mercury, it would be 11 times brighter and 3 three times as large

The Messenger spacecraft

Messenger is the first spacecraft that has orbitted the planet closest to the sun – Mercury. To learn more about its mission, the scientific instruments being used and the questions being answered on the planet, check out the Why Mercury web pages. Messenger is now on a yearlong extended mission to get more than 80,000 images (88,746 images and other data were collected on its one-year  mission,.

Tell us…

Do you ever see images on the face of the closest planet we can see – the moon?